The DAO is the new investment club – Protocol

The DAO is the new investment club – Protocol

The DAO structure popularized in crypto projects is getting adopted by investment clubs looking to invest in digital assets.
Silk Road is a limited edition series of WebGL artworks created by Ezra Miller. The NFT is held by people who are part of the Friends With Benefits DAO through tech startup Prysm.
DAOs sprang up as a way to oversee crypto projects. Now retail investors are adopting the decentralized governance structure to band together in investment clubs. Often the purpose is to buy crypto. Collectively, the informal groups getting set up could vie with venture capital firms seeking to profit off of digital assets.
A number of companies have sprung up to help small groups of friends or associates use a DAO to manage investment clubs to invest in crypto, NFTs or other Web3 assets. While DAOs promise to streamline some aspects of governance, there are still a number of technical aspects to consider such as managing governance, voting, treasury and custody of assets. And it could be a big opportunity if crypto continues to boom.
Some believe this new approach to crypto investing could have a broader impact on the crypto and Web3 startup investing landscape, just as smaller investors have become more common in equity startup investing through AngelList and other investing sites.

Companies such as Syndicate, Prysm and Upstream offer ways for the groups to purchase crypto assets. Some startups offer tools for specific tasks such as voting, while others like Upstream offer the entire “DAO in a box.” Some such as Syndicate and Prysm focus on helping groups that want to buy crypto assets.
“We think of it as a no-code, full-stack DAO-in-a-box where you can spin it up really easily and manage it all in one place,” said Alex Taub, co-founder of Upstream. “And you don’t need to use five different tools to do the things that you need to do to run it.” His company doesn’t focus specifically on investing DAOs, but he’s seen several groups successfully use its DAO tools for the purpose.
“What we’ve started to see and our own personal hypothesis is that this is as disruptive to venture investing as YouTube was to the film and television industries,” said Will Papper, co-founder at Syndicate. “People are setting up investment clubs for all sorts of things that they never would have set up a venture fund for and some groups are setting them up for things that are pretty similar to what they’d use a venture fund for. So the transformative nature of this has been really incredible.”
The rapid growth in these investing DAOs, enabling more small investors to invest, is made possible by their low cost and easy set-up. “People are buying NFTs together that they never would have set up before because in some cases the cost of setting up a fund would have been a sizable percentage of the total amount that they’re raising,” Papper said. “It’s broadened participation in a very significant way.”
The challenge: Regulators want to rein in crypto and there are gray areas that have yet to be resolved about the legal status of DAOs and how they can invest.
Investment clubs have been around for years for buying stocks and other assets. They do not come under SEC regulation, as long as there is not an “investment contract,” which is defined as happening when someone invests and expects to make a profit from the “efforts of others.”

In order to not be SEC-regulated, investment clubs must have no more than 100 members; all members must vote on each investment; and everyone must be part of decision-making.
This is typically how clubs that run on sites like Syndicate operate. “That means they’re not a fund. They don’t need to register with the SEC. They don’t have the filing requirements, they’re just not funds according to the SEC,” said Ian Lee, co-founder of Syndicate.
DAOs, which are still broadly defined, can be used for a variety of investing approaches. Some are more traditional and attached to legal structures such as LLCs, while others do not yet have an equivalent legal structure. Wyoming became the first state to recognize DAOs as a legal entity on their own last year.
The DAO creation business has seen startups tackle the opportunity with several different approaches.
Syndicate focuses on investment clubs, with 1,100 started since it launched in January. It helps people turn a crypto wallet into a DAO for a group of people to invest. Its software also helps manage investments and members.
“We’ve effectively modernized [investment clubs] for the internet and Web3, enabling people to start these investment clubs natively on the internet to invest in internet-native assets, like tokens, and even off-chain things like startups,” Lee said.
The assets of the DAOs on Syndicate are secured by whatever Ethereum or multisignature wallet the DAO wants. Pre-crypto, these clubs used shared bank accounts — which are also an option with Syndicate. Syndicate connects to fintech Doola for DAOs set up as an LLC if they need to, say, invest in startup equity, open a bank account or do compliance or tax filings.
While it has so far focused on investment clubs, Syndicate also allows people to invest in other assets such as startup equity, as well as property and art — one group even wanted to buy a Porsche. In mid-2021, City DAO, which has bought land in Wyoming, used Syndicate to do its legal incorporation.

Prysm, which launched in January, helps groups of friends buy NFTs. The idea is to make it more affordable for individuals to buy high-priced NFTs by pooling their capital with friends or groups.
“Things like Bored Apes, Doodles — the average person is really priced out of that even as an investment opportunity. So we allow for groups to come together to pull together capital in this DAO structure to buy them.” said Thomas Scaria, co-founder and CEO at Prysm.
Prysm tracks deposits and withdrawals of capital into the wallet to track how much each member owns or has rights to. Members can also deposit NFTs that can count as contributed capital in lieu of cash or crypto.
People can use Prysm to propose that a group purchase or sell an NFT. The company also plans to add mass payouts, so if an NFT is sold, funds could be distributed to the group. Prysm doesn’t currently charge a fee for its service.
Prysm typically sees two types of users: One is people pooling money together to buy NFTs as an investment. Another is cultural groups that use Prysm to buy NFTs to support artists or cultural ideas. For example, Friends with Benefits, the popular social DAO, has a subgroup of individuals that is using Prysm to buy NFTs. The full Friends with Benefits DAO itself hasn’t bought NFTs with Prysm yet.
The group purchasing of NFTs can be different from those buying other crypto assets because it can be as much about culture as investing, Scaria said. “They’re an offshoot or continuation of the trends that we saw with retail investors, like flipping sneakers on StockX,” Scaria said. “A lot of Gen Zers and millennials are, for instance, looking at sustainable investing. They don’t really just care purely about financial returns. It’s more about: How can you shape the world in a way that you actually want to live in [it].”
NFTs are generally not securities and the clubs that run on its service are not considered subject to SEC registration, Scaria said.

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Tomio Geron ( @tomiogeron) is a San Francisco-based reporter covering fintech. He was previously a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal, covering venture capital and startups. Before that, he worked as a staff writer at Forbes, covering social media and venture capital, and also edited the Midas List of top tech investors. He has also worked at newspapers covering crime, courts, health and other topics. He can be reached at tgeron@protocol.com or tgeron@protonmail.com.
The company’s new music-focused assistant doesn’t upload any audio recordings to the cloud.
Sonos Voice Control will be available on the company’s speakers in the U.S. at the beginning of next month.
Janko Roettgers (@jank0) is a senior reporter at Protocol, reporting on the shifting power dynamics between tech, media, and entertainment, including the impact of new technologies. Previously, Janko was Variety’s first-ever technology writer in San Francisco, where he covered big tech and emerging technologies. He has reported for Gigaom, Frankfurter Rundschau, Berliner Zeitung, and ORF, among others. He has written three books on consumer cord-cutting and online music and co-edited an anthology on internet subcultures. He lives with his family in Oakland.
Sonos is getting ready to take on Alexa and Google Assistant: The company announced its very own voice assistant Wednesday. Sonos Voice Control will be available on the company’s speakers in the U.S. at the beginning of next month, with plans to launch in France later this year.
Unlike general purpose voice assistants, Sonos Voice Control will be primarily focused on music search and playback, as well as control of Sonos speaker systems. The assistant also differs from Alexa and Google Assistant in that it never uploads any audio to the cloud, but instead processes everything on the device.
That’s key to winning over people who have thus far steered clear of voice assistants, said Sonos senior sound experience manager Greg McAllister. Sonos began making speakers with built-in microphones for voice control in 2017, giving people the choice to either use Alexa or the Google Assistant through those smart speakers.

However, almost half of the voice-capable Sonos speakers it sold aren’t being used for that purpose, according to McAllister. “Time and time again, when we speak to our customers, they express that they have concerns over privacy,” he recently told Protocol.
Sonos got its hands on the technology necessary to build a voice assistant that processes queries locally when it acquired Paris-based Snips in late 2019. To finalize its assistant for the U.S. market, the company teamed up with actor Giancarlo Esposito of “Breaking Bad” fame. The company plans to make additional voice choices available at a later time.
With the launch of its own voice assistant, Sonos is also putting a new spotlight on interoperability issues that have long plagued the industry. At launch, consumers will be able to run Alexa and the Sonos assistant on the same device and invoke them with a specific wake word. However, Google has long resisted this kind of voice interoperability, so people won’t be able to use Sonos Voice Control and the Google Assistant on the same speaker.
At the same time, Sonos also has to stay clear of playing favorites with voice commands, especially since the company is also running its own music services. To do so, Sonos is asking people to set their favorite music service in its app; if none is set, it will default to the most-used service, and consider other services as fallback options.
That’s especially noteworthy because Sonos Voice Control won’t work with every service at launch: The voice assistant is capable of sending queries to Sonos Radio, Apple Music, Amazon Music, Deezer and Pandora, but isn’t working with Spotify just yet.
“We are working towards having them part of Sonos Voice Control,” promised Sonos voice experience director David Leroy, without providing additional details.
Janko Roettgers (@jank0) is a senior reporter at Protocol, reporting on the shifting power dynamics between tech, media, and entertainment, including the impact of new technologies. Previously, Janko was Variety’s first-ever technology writer in San Francisco, where he covered big tech and emerging technologies. He has reported for Gigaom, Frankfurter Rundschau, Berliner Zeitung, and ORF, among others. He has written three books on consumer cord-cutting and online music and co-edited an anthology on internet subcultures. He lives with his family in Oakland.
Imagine: You’re the leader of a real estate team at a restaurant brand looking to open a new location in Manhattan. You have two options you’re evaluating: one site in SoHo, and another site in the Flatiron neighborhood. Which do you choose?

Companies that need to make these types of decisions leverage foot traffic patterns coupled with additional data sources to build a sound approach to real estate and investment decisions. Below, we take a closer look at points of interest and foot traffic patterns to demonstrate how location data can be leveraged to inform better site selecti­on strategies.
Here’s how foot traffic data can impact site selection or real-estate decisions.
Look at your competitive set: Identify current venues in a neighborhood or area to determine where there might be white space and to quantify the competitive landscape. Analyze your overall competitive set (e.g., in this report we looked at all restaurants) as well as more specific, relevant categories of venues (e.g., in this report we looked at cafes). Know which places your prospective customers go now, and where you might have an opportunity to take market share or position yourself alongside businesses that provide synergies.

Know whether your consumer traffic would come from tourists, or locals: Classify tourists versus locals by looking at individuals with home ZIP codes more than 120 miles away in your analysis to better understand the catchment area (i.e., where consumers are coming from).
Know more about consumers in your neighborhood: Analyze the demographics of consumers in a particular neighborhood to understand the types of people a prospective site might draw so that you can select the optimal location based on your target audience.
Uncover changes in visit patterns over time, and within a typical week: Look at a particular neighborhood over time in order to capitalize on trends, selecting a site where traffic may be on the rise. Compare visitation patterns by neighborhood to understand the traffic you might expect to see throughout the week at a given site, informing and validating (or invalidating) your projections. Know what day of week experiences the most natural footfall traffic.
Understand the trends and what your consumers like: It’s critical to know what consumers are looking for, how they spend their time and what they like now and into the future.
Use data-visualization platforms and tools to make insights easy: Data-visualization platforms make complex information and insights easier to understand and ultimately react to. You’ll see companies that adopt data visualization are empowered and can spot emerging trends and speed reaction time.

Key learnings:
Different target audiences with different needs
SoHo: Consumers visiting restaurants in SoHo are primarily locals (83%) ages 25-34 (44%). Restaurants in this area attract super shoppers, affluent socialites, health-conscious consumers and a cultured and artsy crowd.
Flatiron: People visiting restaurants in Flatiron are primarily locals (86%) ages 25-34 (46%). Restaurants in this area attract health-conscious consumers, corporate professionals, college students and people who crave unique experiences.
Visitation patterns and staffing/hours of operation vary

Soho: A restaurant in SoHo may struggle to draw consistent foot traffic throughout the earlier part of the day and week: Restaurants in SoHo rely heavily on weekend visits (38% of total weekly visits) in the late afternoons (60% of total daily visits occur after 3 p.m.).
Flatiron: A restaurant in Flatiron may struggle to draw consistent foot traffic throughout later day-parts and weekends: Restaurants in Flatiron rely heavily on weekday visits (70% of total weekly visits) in the earlier part of the day (45% of total daily visits occur before 3 p.m.).
Competitive differences
SoHo: A new restaurant in NYC’s SoHo neighborhood will face tough competition with more than 435 restaurants in the area, including over 48 cafes. Top-visited restaurants in this area include Gitano, Prince Street Pizza and Thai Diner.
Flatiron: A new restaurant might face less competition in Manhattan’s Flatiron neighborhood, with roughly 267 restaurants in the area, including only 25 cafes. Top-visited restaurants in this area include Eataly, Shake Shack and The Smith.
While a new restaurant in NYC’s Flatiron neighborhood may face less competition compared to a new restaurant in SoHo, location data verifies what it takes to be successful in both neighborhoods.
Outcomes and next steps
In order to be successful in Flatiron, a restaurant will need to draw a weekday lunch crowd with healthy offerings and a work-friendly setting for professionals; to stand out among nearly double the restaurants in SoHo, a new restaurant should lean into arts and culture with a design-forward setting, and focus on evening and weekend offerings.
Read the full report to better understand the role of location data in uncovering trends in consumer behavior, assessing the competitive landscape and unlocking unique opportunities for venue expansion.
The smartphone giants are trying to lock in mobile users with a digitized version of the physical wallet for drivers’ licenses, tickets and credit cards.
The new Google Wallet will handle all credit and payment cards as well as nonpayment items you would have in your physical wallet, such as driver’s licenses or state IDs.
Tomio Geron ( @tomiogeron) is a San Francisco-based reporter covering fintech. He was previously a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal, covering venture capital and startups. Before that, he worked as a staff writer at Forbes, covering social media and venture capital, and also edited the Midas List of top tech investors. He has also worked at newspapers covering crime, courts, health and other topics. He can be reached at tgeron@protocol.com or tgeron@protonmail.com.
Google is launching a new Google Wallet app on Android and Wear OS, looking to streamline its payments products and lock users into Android more tightly.
The move is part of a broader effort by tech giants Google and Apple to bind consumers more closely into their mobile devices by making the digital wallet as essential to consumers’ everyday lives as the physical wallet.
That means making the digital wallet not just a way to pay at the point of sale with a credit card but also use tickets, IDs and other essential items.
The new Google Wallet, announced Wednesday at Google I/O and available sometime in early summer, will handle all credit and payment cards as well as nonpayment items you would have in your physical wallet, such as driver’s licenses or state IDs, library cards, concert tickets, boarding passes, vaccine cards and loyalty cards. Google is also working on supporting other pass types, like hotel keys and office badges.

Google already has the Google Pay app, but that will be changing. In 39 of the 42 markets where Google Pay stores payments cards and tickets and offers tap-to-pay functionality, Google Pay will become Google Wallet. These countries include Australia, Brazil, France, Canada, Germany, the U.K. and Taiwan.
In the U.S. and Singapore, where Google Pay is a payments app that people can use for paying friends, finding deals and managing their money, Google is launching a separate Google Wallet app. In India, where Google Pay supports the popular UPI payments system, people will keep the same Google Pay app.
“Wallet is a container for all your payments and nonpayment use cases. And I think that’s a really important distinction because many of the wallet use cases used to be in Google Pay—now we’re pulling them out into Google Wallet,” said Arnold Goldberg, VP and general manager of Payments and NBU at Google.
Creating a separate Google Wallet app could bring more clarity for developers and for consumers with the analogy of a physical wallet.
Google Pay and Google’s payment products generally have gone through a number of iterations. Google Pay consolidated other payment services, including one called Android Pay, and a prior version of Google Wallet launched in 2011. Google Pay was most recently set to become the anchor of a consumer banking product with checking and debit accounts through partner banks such as Citigroup, but Google dropped that plan last year.
Google Pay will now be for peer-to-peer payments, deals and managing your money, Goldberg said.
Google Wallet will be available for developers who want to build on it, for things like barcodes or QR codes used for items such as library cards or event tickets. Google is working directly with states and local governments to do more complex integrations such as driver’s licenses.
Google is also working on ways that the Wallet can be tied into other Google services. For example, if a transit card is added to the Wallet, the card and its balance will show up in Google Maps when searching for directions. And users can then tap to add to the balance. This integration will be live with more than 100 transit agencies at launch, Google said.

Granular privacy controls will ensure that users can keep information such as vaccine cards private across other Google services, Goldberg said.
Apple, for its part, has already pushed deeply into building a digital version of the physical wallet. It has added the ability for consumers to add a digital driver’s license in Arizona, which the TSA will accept at certain security checkpoints. Apple is working on adding more states soon.
Regulators have taken an interest in how mobile wallets are used by tech giants. The European Commission said last week that Apple is violating its antitrust rules by limiting competitors’ mobile wallets.
Google is also announcing Wednesday a new virtual card feature for Chrome. Chrome can already store consumers’ credit cards to autofill them for payments. With the new feature, users can create a virtual card, which disguises the actual card number to increase security. The virtual card will also auto-generate a CVV code, so users will not have to pull out a physical card to enter it. This will be available this summer in the U.S. for Visa, American Express and Capital One cards with Mastercard coming later this year.
Tomio Geron ( @tomiogeron) is a San Francisco-based reporter covering fintech. He was previously a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal, covering venture capital and startups. Before that, he worked as a staff writer at Forbes, covering social media and venture capital, and also edited the Midas List of top tech investors. He has also worked at newspapers covering crime, courts, health and other topics. He can be reached at tgeron@protocol.com or tgeron@protonmail.com.
Sony and Nintendo say they still can’t produce hardware fast enough to meet demand.
The chip shortage has been a continuous roadblock to what is otherwise a record period of growth for the video game industry.
Nick Statt is Protocol’s video game reporter. Prior to joining Protocol, he was news editor at The Verge covering the gaming industry, mobile apps and antitrust out of San Francisco, in addition to managing coverage of Silicon Valley tech giants and startups. He now resides in Rochester, New York, home of the garbage plate and, completely coincidentally, the World Video Game Hall of Fame. He can be reached at nstatt@protocol.com.
The global chip shortage is still squeezing the game industry, according to statements from representatives of Nintendo and Sony this week, timed to earnings results. In the words of Nintendo President Shuntaro Furukawa: “There is no end in sight to the semiconductor shortage at this point.”
The chip shortage has been a continuous roadblock to what is otherwise a record period of growth for the video game industry, spurred by the pandemic and coupled with broader mainstream popularity of gaming.
While a number of the biggest video game makers continue to post record sales and profits — including Electronics Arts, Capcom and Bandai Namco this week — hardware makers like Microsoft, Nintendo and Sony are still contending with a semiconductor supply crunch affecting much of the electronics industry. Earlier this month, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger said that the chip shortage is now expected to continue into 2024.
Nintendo’s Switch handheld is entering its sixth year on the market, and demand for the device is beginning to wane. The company has sold more than 107 million devices so far, but Nintendo is hoping it can still sell tens of millions of units before it inevitably releases a next-generation version of the device some time in the next few years.

Furukawa said the transition to a new hardware device, amid the shortage and considering Nintendo’s poor track record on backward compatibility, is “a major concern for us,” according to a transcript translated by VGC. He added that “based on our experiences with the Wii, Nintendo DS and other hardware, it is very clear that one of the major obstacles is how to easily transition from one hardware to the next.
Because Nintendo is more reliant on hardware sales than its competitors, the company reported a 3.6% decline in sales last quarter and flat net profit, despite record software sales in fiscal 2021. It also projected a 20% year-over-year decline in Switch sales (down to 23 million units) in the year ahead.
Sony, which reported a strong quarter on Tuesday despite the crunch on PlayStation 5 supply, said it missed its original fiscal 2021 sales target by 3.3 million consoles, selling only 11.5 million in the device’s second year on the market due entirely to constrained supply. The company is selling every console it can produce, but it’s had to adjust its forecast on multiple occasions to account for the ongoing chip shortage. Sony expects the situation to improve in the following year, and it set a sales target of 18 million units for fiscal 2022.
“We feel very comfortable that we can get the parts and components, and we feel that there is a bit higher demand than that, so if the question is whether we can meet the demand, I think we’re still short somewhat,” Hiroki Totoki, Sony’s chief financial officer, said on an earnings call earlier this week.
Microsoft, on the other hand, has managed to produce Xbox consoles at a faster clip due to what some analysts suspect is paid priority at semiconductor plants. Thanks to reduced demand for its devices compared to the PS5 and the availability of both a cheaper and more expensive version of new Xbox, the Xbox platform has gained market share against its rival two quarters in a row. (Right now in the U.S., you can order an Xbox Series X from Microsoft’s website and have it delivered by June, while the Series S is widely available at all major retailers.)

Yet Microsoft has placed less priority on selling consoles versus signing up consumers for its Game Pass subscription and expanding its audience through cloud gaming.
For Nintendo and Sony, though, the issues run deeper: Nintendo wants a longer runway for the Switch before it has to start investing in the next generation, and Sony needs more consoles in more consumers’ hands to sell first-party exclusive games and more subscription products of its own. Both companies are now gearing up to navigate a manufacturing crisis that’s persisted for nearly two years, and likely will persist for many more.
Nick Statt is Protocol’s video game reporter. Prior to joining Protocol, he was news editor at The Verge covering the gaming industry, mobile apps and antitrust out of San Francisco, in addition to managing coverage of Silicon Valley tech giants and startups. He now resides in Rochester, New York, home of the garbage plate and, completely coincidentally, the World Video Game Hall of Fame. He can be reached at nstatt@protocol.com.
More than 25 human and digital rights organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union, Electronic Privacy Information Center and Fight for the Future sent a letter to Zoom demanding the company end any plans to incorporate emotion AI features in its meeting software.
The validity of emotion AI has been seriously questioned, and often raises ethical concerns.
Kate Kaye is an award-winning multimedia reporter digging deep and telling print, digital and audio stories. She covers AI and data for Protocol. Her reporting on AI and tech ethics issues has been published in OneZero, Fast Company, MIT Technology Review, CityLab, Ad Age and Digiday and heard on NPR. Kate is the creator of RedTailMedia.org and is the author of “Campaign ’08: A Turning Point for Digital Media,” a book about how the 2008 presidential campaigns used digital media and data.
The drumbeat against emotion AI is getting louder.
On Wednesday more than 25 human and digital rights organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union, Electronic Privacy Information Center and Fight for the Future sent a letter to Zoom demanding the company end potential plans to incorporate emotion AI features in its software. The letter comes in response to reporting in Protocol in April highlighting Zoom’s consideration of incorporating AI in its virtual meeting software to detect and analyze people’s moods and emotions.
“As a leader in the industry, [Zoom] really has the opportunity to set the tone and the pace with a lot of new developments in video meetings, and we think it’s really critical that they hear from civil rights groups about this,” said Caitlin Seeley George, campaign director at Fight for the Future, a digital rights group that launched the campaign against Zoom’s possible use of emotion AI in April.

“This software is discriminatory, manipulative, potentially dangerous and based on assumptions that all people use the same facial expressions, voice patterns, and body language,” wrote the groups in the letter sent on Wednesday to Eric Yuan, founder and CEO of Zoom, demanding the company end plans to incorporate emotion AI in its software features.
Emotion AI uses computer vision and facial recognition, speech recognition, natural-language processing and other AI technologies to capture data representing people’s external expressions in an effort to detect their internal emotions, attitudes or feelings.
“Zoom’s use of this software gives credence to the pseudoscience of emotion analysis which experts agree does not work. Facial expressions can vary significantly and are often disconnected from the emotions underneath such that even humans are often not able to accurately decipher them,” they continued.
“It feels like they are a company that is open to considering all these factors,” Seeley George said of Zoom. She said Zoom has not responded to the organization’s requests to discuss the issue. The company also has not responded to Protocol’s requests to comment.

AI-based features for assessing people’s emotional states are showing up in virtual classroom platforms and technology used in vehicles to detect driver distraction, signs of drunkenness and road rage. Behind the scenes, companies that produce synthetic images and video data are supplying raw materials used to train emotion AI and related systems, but sometimes those companies are removed from the end uses of the data they provide.
The validity of emotion AI has been seriously questioned, and often raises ethical concerns. Some research shows the ways people express emotions such as happiness, anger or surprise vary across cultures and situations. What others might interpret from someone’s facial expressions can be different from what that person is actually feeling. In particular, neurodivergent people might express emotion in ways that can be inaccurately interpreted by other people or emotion AI.
Emotion AI has come under fire in recent years. In 2019, the AI Now Institute called for a ban on the use of emotion AI in important decisions such as hiring and when judging student performance. In 2021, the Brookings Institution called for it to be banned in use by law enforcement.

Some advocates pushing to stop the use of emotion AI worry that people will become increasingly comfortable with it if it is built into more everyday tech products. “People will get desensitized to the fact that they are under constant surveillance by these technologies,” Seeley George said.
“The opportunity for mission drift, for data sharing and for unknown consequences is just so high,” she said, noting that data assessing people’s behaviors and emotions could be shared with other corporations, government agencies or law enforcement.
Kate Kaye is an award-winning multimedia reporter digging deep and telling print, digital and audio stories. She covers AI and data for Protocol. Her reporting on AI and tech ethics issues has been published in OneZero, Fast Company, MIT Technology Review, CityLab, Ad Age and Digiday and heard on NPR. Kate is the creator of RedTailMedia.org and is the author of “Campaign ’08: A Turning Point for Digital Media,” a book about how the 2008 presidential campaigns used digital media and data.
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